VILLA ARSON (NICE)

en - it - fr

VILLA ARSON (NICE)

Direction:
Jean-Pierre Simon
Eric Mangion

Contacts:
20, Avenue Stephen Liégeard, 06105 Nice
telephone +33 (0)4 92 07 73 73
e-mail cnac@villa-arson.org
website www.villa-arson.org

Info:
open Wednesday-Monday 2-6 pm
(2-7 pm in July and August)

The Villa Arson includes a school of art, an art center, artists’ residencies and a multimedia library; therefore its artistic program aims at highlighting the relation between education and creation, research and transmission. The exhibitions stem from projects conducted at the Villa by teachers, artists in residence, as well as projects conducted in collaboration with other national or international institutions (schools of art, art centers, associations…) with the goal of increasing exchanges and collaborations. The Villa Arson also invites guest artists and curators who would like to carry through singular projects in the context of their research.
On top of its residency/research program for graduate students, 5/7, the Villa Arson welcomes two artists in residence every year. Each receives a grant from the DRAC Provence Alpes-Côte d’Azur. The artists have housing accommodations on campus for three months and benefit from the use of a private studio. Artists may not apply for these residencies: they are chosen by the director of the Villa Arson and the director of the art center according to projects that must be carried out at the Villa in the context of the artistic or educational program.
Lastly, thanks to the support of the DRAC Provence Alpes-Côte d’Azur, the Villa Arson also has a program of short residencies for young curators who wish to work on the writing and preparation of exhibition projects. They benefit from free housing accommodation and access to the multimedia library to carry on their research. Transport to Nice is also offered. Guest curators have the opportunity to meet young artists who have graduated from the Villa Arson and who might contribute to their projects.

Ryan Gander. The Die Is Cast, 2009. Installation view

2. Ryan Gander. The Die Is Cast, 2009. Installation view

Roman Ondák, Door Leading to Many Directions, 1997

3. Roman Ondák, Door Leading to Many Directions, 1997

Project: From & To

 

In collegamento col suo statuto di scuola legata a un centro d’arte, alle residenze di artisti e alla mediateca, la programmazione artistica di Villa Arson punta a valorizzare le relazioni tra insegnamento, creazione, ricerca e trasmissione. Le mostre nascono da progetti realizzati internamente dagli insegnanti, gli artisti, ma anche con strutture esterne nazionali o internazionali (scuole d’arte, centri d’arte, reti associative…) al fine di moltiplicare gli scambi e le collaborazioni. Sono anche invitati a partecipare i curatori che desiderano attuare progetti specifici nell’ambito della propria ricerca.

En lien avec son statut d’école liée à un centre d’art, des résidences d’artistes et une médiathèque, la programmation artistique de la Villa Arson souhaite mettre en valeur les relations entre enseignement, création, recherche et transmission. Les expositions sont issues de projets menés en interne par les enseignants, les artistes résidents, mais aussi avec des structures extérieures, nationales ou internationales (écoles d’art, centres d’art, réseaux associatifs…) afin de multiplier les échanges et les collaborations. Des invitations sont également lancées à des artistes ou à des commissaires désireux de mener à bien des projets singuliers dans le cadre de leur recherche.
Parallèlement à son programme de résidences/recherche lié au post-diplôme 5/7, la Villa Arson accueille deux artistes en résidence par an. Chacun reçoit une allocation de résidence versée par la DRAC Provence Alpes-Côte d’Azur. Les artistes sont hébergés sur place pour une période de trois mois environ et bénéficient d’un atelier individuel. Aucune candidature spontanée n’est envisageable. Les artistes sont choisis par le directeur de l’établissement et par le directeur du centre d’art en fonction de projets à développer sur place dans le cadre de la programmation artistique ou pédagogique.
Enfin, avec le soutien de la DRAC Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur, la Villa Arson mène un programme de résidences courtes pour des commissaires souhaitant travailler à l’écriture et à la préparation de projets d’exposition. Ils peuvent ainsi bénéficier gratuitement d’un studio et du fonds de la bibliothèque pour mener à bien leurs recherches. Sont pris en charge leurs frais de transport sur Nice. Les commissaires invités ont ainsi l’occasion de rencontrer des jeunes artistes issus de la Villa Arson qui pourront éventuellement participer à leurs projets.

Images:
1. Mike Kelley, A Fax Transmission from: Oct. 21, 1986, 1 :07 p.m., 1986-2004, installation, mixed media, 220 x 289 x 122 cm. Exhibition L’institut des archives sauvages, Villa Arson, 17 February – 28 May 2012
2. Ryan Gander, Cyclopean Illusion (Remi), 2009. C-print framed under serigraphed glass, 45 x 30 cm (photograph), 40 x 55 x 4 cm (frame). Courtesy of the artist; Ryan Gander, Gallery Cover, 2000-2007 installation (orange canvas, runners, 9 spots), dimensions of the room. Courtesy of the artist and Annet Gelink Gallery, Amsterdam. Exhibition The Die Is Cast, Villa Arson, 26 June – 18 October 2009
3. Roman Ondák, Door Leading to Many Directions, 1997, installation, 168 x 95 x 27 cm. Courtesy of the artist. Exhibition Shaking Horizon, Villa Arson, 2 July – 17 October 2010

close
en - it - fr

VINCENT HONORÉ IN CONVERSATION WITH ERIC MANGION, VILLA ARSON, NICE

VINCENT HONORÉ IN CONVERSATION WITH ERIC MANGION, VILLA ARSON, NICE

Vincent Honoré The Villa Arson is an institution that includes an art school, artist residencies, a multimedia library and a centre d’art. One could say that it’s an institution where contemporary art is taught, researched, produced and exhibited. The only thing missing is a collection, despite a few perennial works installed in 1989-90. How do you conceive your programme’s link to the site’s various other activities, particularly to the art school?
Eric Mangion We very simply try to programme exhibitions, meetings or residencies in relation to practices in or around the school. Sometimes we extend direct invitations to members of the teaching staff who are creating projects–as we did between February and May 2015 with the exhibition Bricologie led by Burkard Blümlein, Thomas Golsenne and Sarah Tritz, all teachers at the Villa Arson. This can also be more indirect projects with residents (Oliver Beer & Shingo Yoshida or Sébastien Remy & Cyril Verde), or invitations to external curators who develop research projects that are close to our interests, as we’ll be doing in 2016 with Géraldine Gourbe.

2. Ryan Gander. The Die Is Cast, 2009. Installation view

2. Ryan Gander. The Die Is Cast, 2009. Installation view

V.H. In a geographical area like yours, specifically what are the main responsibilities of a director of a centre d’art in 2014? And what is your relationship with politics?
E.M. I’m not the managing director of the establishment (that’s Jean-Pierre Simon’s job). So I have no direct involvement in the political side. On the other hand, when I arrived in Nice, I thought about the question of a political territory. This is why in 2007 and 2011 we conducted two research and exhibition projects on the history of performance and on the history of music and sound practices on the Côte d’Azur. These are two ventures that the local population isn’t very aware of, and yet they were rich in very fascinating contents. For me this was all about redefining our political view of a region known more for gloss than artistic experimentation. Quite frankly, it can’t really be said that it worked locally!

Roman Ondák, Door Leading to Many Directions, 1997

3. Roman Ondák, Door Leading to Many Directions, 1997. Installation view

V.H. The fact that the Villa doesn’t have responsibility for a collection: is this a flaw?
E.M. The Villa Arson has a very official status as a school that houses a centre d’art that paradoxically has no status. No school or centre d’art, as far as I know, has the mission of assembling a collection. We have so much else to do that I don’t even consider this question, and I don’t think anyone else here does either.

V.H. How can the DNA of a centre d’art be defined? What distinguishes it from other similar organisations?
E.M. In my view, the Villa Arson centre d’art should–like all of the other centres d’art –serve as a place for artistic experimentation. A place where you test art, where you thoroughly explore not contemporary art as a genre but contemporary creativity full stop. Experimenting means above all testing things without thinking of market values or meeting some predetermined measure of success. The luxury of Villa Arson is to work in a school with its workshops, its research programmes, its enormous library, its complex and multifaceted architecture, and its residencies. Our DNA is to work according to the modus operandi of a potluck, with everyone bringing their own knowledge and experience. However there’s no denying that this system has constraints. The educational concerns are not necessarily the same as the expectations of a centre d’art, and vice versa. Even if we keep up the spirit of a laboratory, we’re a big machine and this catches up with us quite often. We’re constantly living in our own paradoxes.

4. Diane Blondeau / Vivien Roubaud / Thomas Teurlai, Jambes de bottes, 2014

4. Diane Blondeau / Vivien Roubaud / Thomas Teurlai, Jambes de bottes, 2014

V.H. Why did you decide to take part in PIANO, and what’s the project you’re presenting?
E.M. PIANO enabled us to work with Italy, whose geographical and cultural proximity to Nice is well known, and especially to work with the Kunst Meran Merano Arte with which we very quickly shared the same idea. During preparatory meetings between the AMACI and the d.c.a, Valerio Dehò(artistic director of the Kunst Meran) suggested that we revive a project they had initiated in 2007 under the title FROM & TO. It was all about getting young artists to work together without imposing any themes or guidelines whatsoever. We thought this idea seemed just right in the context of an exchange between two organisations, two countries and, quite obviously, between different artists who initially had nothing to do with one another. So we assembled ten artists, five from Italy and five from France who had very different practices. We organised two workshops, then created an exchange platform. The collaborations didn’t live up to our hopes. On the other hand, what worked was that the exhibition very clearly reflects the practices of each artist without any added value. Even if it’s uneven as a whole, we revealed a work site, one that isn’t cohesive but is decidedly generous, and that was the purpose of the game.

5. Lorraine Château, Installation The Cloud, 2014

5. Lorraine Château, Installation The Cloud, 2014

Vincent Honoré La Villa Arson est une institution qui inclut une école d’art, des résidences d’artistes, une médiathèque et un centre d’art. C’est en quelque sorte un institut dans lequel l’art contemporain est enseigné, recherché, produit et montré. Seule manque une collection, malgré quelques œuvres pérennes installées en 1989/90. Comment concevez-vous l’articulation de votre programme avec les différentes autres activités du site, en particulier avec l’école d’art ?
Eric Mangion Nous essayons tout simplement de programmer des expositions, rencontres ou résidences en lien avec les pratiques menées dans ou à la frontière de l’école. Parfois il s’agit d’une invitation directe à des membres du corps pédagogique porteurs de projets – comme entre février et mai 2015 avec l’exposition Bricologie menée par Burkard Blümlein, Thomas Golsenne et Sarah Tritz, tous enseignants à la Villa Arson. Cela peut être aussi des projets plus indirects avec des résidents (Oliver Beer & Shingo Yoshida ou Sébastien Remy & Cyril Verde), ou des invitations faites à des commissaires extérieurs qui développent des projets de recherche proches de nos préoccupations tel que nous le ferons en 2016 avec Géraldine Gourbe.

V.H. Dans un secteur géographique comme le votre, en particulier, quelles sont les principales responsabilités d’un directeur de centre d’art en 2014 ? Et quelles sont vos relations avec le politique ?
E.M. Je ne suis pas directeur général de l’établissement (Jean-Pierre Simon assure cette fonction). Du coup je n’ai pas de prise directe avec le politique. Par contre quand je suis arrivé à Nice, je me suis posé la question d’un territoire politique. C’est pour cette raison que nous avons mené entre 2007 et 2011 deux projets de recherche et d’exposition sur l’histoire de la performance et sur l’histoire des pratiques musicales et sonores sur la Côte d’Azur. Ce sont deux aventures peu connues du public local et qui pourtant sont riches de contenus tout à fait passionnants. Il s’agissait pour moi de redéfinir le regard politique que nous portons sur une région plus connue pour ses strass que pour son expérimentation artistique. Pour être très franc, on ne peut pas dire que cela ait fonctionné localement !

V.H. Le fait que la Villa n’ait pas la responsabilité d’une collection : est-ce un manque ?
E.M. La Villa Arson a un statut très officiel d’école dans laquelle cohabite un centre d’art paradoxalement sans statut. Aucune école et aucun centre d’art n’ont à ma connaissance mission à constituer une collection. Nous avons tant d’autres choses à entreprendre que cette question ne se pose pas pour moi, ni je crois pour quelconque ici.

V.H. Comment définir l’A.D.N. du centre d’art, ce qui le singularise par rapport a d’autres structures similaires ?
E.M. Le centre d’art de la Villa Arson doit à mon sens – comme tous les autres centres d’art – fonctionner comme un lieu d’expérimentation artistique. Un lieu où l’on teste l’art, où l’on met à plat non pas l’art contemporain comme genre mais la création contemporaine tout court. Expérimenter c’est avant tout tester les choses sans penser aux valeurs du marché ou à une quelconque réussite programmée d’avance. Le luxe de la Villa Arson est de travailler dans une école avec ses ateliers, ses programmes de recherche, son énorme bibliothèque, son architecture complexe et multiple, et ses résidences. Notre ADN est de fonctionner selon le mode opératoire d’une auberge espagnole dans laquelle tout le monde amène son expérience et ses savoirs. Par contre on ne peut pas nier que ce système a ses contraintes. Les enjeux pédagogiques ne sont pas forcément les mêmes que les attentes d’un centre d’art. Et inversement. Même si nous entretenons l’esprit laboratoire, la grosse machine que nous sommes nous rattrape bien souvent. Nous vivons en permanence dans nos propres paradoxes.

V.H. Pourquoi avoir décidé de faire partie de PIANO et quel est le projet que vous présentez ?
E.M. PIANO a permis de travailler avec l’Italie dont on connaît la proximité géographique et culturelle avec Nice, mais surtout de travailler avec le Kunst Meran Merano Arte avec qui nous avons très vite partagé une pensée complice. Lors des rencontres préparatoires entre AMACI et d.c.a, Valerio Dehò (le directeur artistique du Kunst Meran) nous a proposé de réactiver un projet qu’ils avaient initié en 2007 sous le titre FROM & TO. Il s’agissait de faire travailler des jeunes artistes ensemble sans imposer de thème ni d’axe quelconque. Cette idée nous est apparue très juste dans le cadre d’un échange entre deux structures, deux pays et, bien évidemment, entre différents artistes qui au départ n’avaient rien à faire ensemble. Nous avons donc réuni dix artistes, dont cinq italiens et cinq français en fonction de pratiques très variées. Nous avons organisé deux workshops, puis créé une plateforme d’échanges. Les collaborations n’ont pas été à la hauteur de nos espérances. Par contre, ce qui a fonctionné c’est que l’exposition reflète très clairement les pratiques de chacun sans valeur ajoutée. Même si l’ensemble est inégal, nous avons mis au jour un plateau de travail, non pas cohérent mais résolument généreux, ce qui était le but du jeu.

Images:
1. Roberto Pugliese, Emergences acoustiques, 2014. Courtesy: Associazione Culturale Dello Scompigio, Vorno, Capannori (Italy) and Galerie Mario Mazzoli, Berlin
2. Ryan Gander, Cyclopean Illusion (Remi), 2009. C-print framed under serigraphed glass, 45 x 30 cm (photograph), 40 x 55 x 4 cm (frame). Courtesy of the artist; Ryan Gander, Gallery Cover, 2000-2007 installation (orange canvas, runners, 9 spots), dimensions of the room. Courtesy of the artist and Annet Gelink Gallery, Amsterdam. Exhibition The Die Is Cast, Villa Arson, 26 June – 18 October 2009
3. Roman Ondák, Door Leading to Many Directions, 1997, installation, 168 x 95 x 27 cm. Courtesy of the artist. Exhibition Shaking Horizon, Villa Arson, 2 July – 17 October 2010
4. Diane Blondeau / Vivien Roubaud / Thomas Teurlai, Jambes de bottes, 2014
5. Lorraine Château, Installation The Cloud, 2014

close